Tag Archives: Filmmaking

The AFI Interview: AFI Alumnus Charlie McDowell on THE DISCOVERY

Posted by Larry Gleeson

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Director/writer Charlie McDowell (AFI Class of 2006) and writer Justin Lader (AFI Class of 2008) pair up once again for THE DISCOVERY, their followup to 2014’s THE ONE I LOVE. The film is another high-concept, relationship-based mystery, this time revolving around questions of faith and the afterlife. It stars Rooney Mara, Jason Segel, Robert Redford, Riley Keough and Jesse Plemons. AFI caught up with McDowell following the the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, where THE DISCOVERY world-premiered.

THE DISCOVERY arrives on Netflix March 31.

MAL_8208 B&WAFI: Tell us about your new film starring Jason Segel and Rooney Mara, THE DISCOVERY, the follow-up to your previous film THE ONE I LOVE.

CM: With Justin Lader, who’s my writing partner, we started with a sort of big universal question: “What if the afterlife was scientifically proven and what would that mean for the world?” How would people react in today’s society or in a heightened society in the near future? We came back to the universal question, which is “Where do we go when we die?” We’re programmed at a young age to think about it, even in cartoons, when a character dies, the character floats to heaven or hell, and these ideas are obviously in religion. These interest everyone from the beginning of time. For us, it’s really interesting to propose a question of “What if it was guaranteed we went somewhere, and we knew if we went somewhere?” That was the first basic question and then we came up with this idea shortly after, well, “Is death ‘death’ anymore because you’re continuing your life somewhere else? Are suicide and murder the same thing as we know them to be?” That’s how we started and we used that as the backdrop to this world that we’re exploring but, really, it’s about our main characters in this world, and it becomes mostly focused on a love story between a man and a woman and a father story as well.

AFI: Talk about your writing process with Justin Lader. Did you guys meet at AFI? He wrote THE ONE I LOVE.

CM: He [graduated] two years after me, but I had a best friend in the Producing program and basically I was looking to team up with a writer for a movie idea, and he said that Justin was such a talented writer. He put us in contact, and I read a script that Justin had written his second year and really loved it, and we ended up developing that script for a couple years and tried to make it. We had a cast and financing and then the financing fell through and that’s what got us to jump into making THE ONE I LOVE for very little money. What brought us together was this other script called “Fighting Jacob” that Justin had written his second year.

AFI: Can you talk about your collaboration with Netflix, and at what point they stepped in to acquire and distribute THE DISCOVERY?

CM: Netflix had really been interested in the idea and loved the script early on, and we had been in talks with them, and they really liked how the cast ended up shaping up so, while we were filming our first week, they called and said they want to acquire this as a worldwide film and have it be a Netflix Original.

It’s such an interesting time in independent film, and there are pros and cons to this new digital era and the way we do movies. I really am mixed about it because I am a traditional thinker in that I make a film with the idea that it’s going to be seen on a big screen, but with this film in particular, to me the partnership really made sense because I wanted this to be something that a lot of people could see. If you release traditionally in the theater with an independent distributor, it will go to 50 cities and very few people will see it, so the idea that 90 million users in 160 countries felt right for the film. We wanted it to be this global idea … because I think people will view it differently depending on your makeup and who you are as a person. It’s definitely a movie I hope people will watch more than once. It’s a movie that, if you see it a second time, it’s a very different viewing, and you pick up on a lot of different things and maybe your view changes. It’s meditative in that way, and it felt like with Netflix, you could watch the film, then you could watch it again two minutes later or you could wait a week and then you can tell your friends about it. The idea that people could view the film that way was exciting.

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AFI: You’ve had great success at Sundance with THE ONE I LOVE and now THE DISCOVERY. The festival is typically a great launching pad for American indies looking to break out. How was your experience different this time around?

CM: It was a very different experience this time compared to THE ONE I LOVE. No one knew what that film was. It very under the radar, it premiered on a Tuesday night, after the first weekend. And THE DISCOVERY premiered at the Eccles on a Friday night, opening weekend, and we had Redford in the film. People knew about our film, and there was an expectation for it. Again, there are pros and cons to all of that. People were excited to see the movie and it was sold out. To play the Eccles was such an honor but also there was something I liked about THE ONE I LOVE, having no expectations and letting the movie be its own thing. We had a really strong audience reaction, almost everyone stayed for the Q&As. Everyone wanted to bring their own ideas to the film, which is the reason we made it.

AFI: You took an improvisatory approach to writing THE ONE I LOVE. How about with THE DISCOVERY?

CM: Justin and I developed THE ONE I LOVE together and because it was such a quick situation, Justin was scripting pages throughout the process of filming. While I was focused on shooting he was scripting pages for the next day. It’s an odd way to make a film, but we had worked off of this 50-page outline that had every scene detailed but there was no dialogue. It wasn’t a traditional script in terms of dialogue.

With THE ONE I LOVE, all the twists and turns weren’t improvised. We had a very clear understanding of the story and how it unfolded. We were loose with the dialogue. But with THE DISCOVERY, because it was done in a more traditional way and we actually had more days to do it, we always wanted it to be something that had less improv, where we could focus on the page at the beginning, and then let the actors play loose with the dialogue because we’re not so crazy about saying words exactly as they’re written. We like a naturalistic feel.

AFI: You’ve also directed an episode of Netflix original series DEAR WHITE PEOPLE, based on the film by Justin Simien. What can we expect to see?

CM: Each episode is through a different point of view and the directors bring their own vision to it. Obviously, there’s the umbrella of the show you have to stay in, but [Justin] wanted to give free range to the directors to play and do their own thing. I thought that was such an interesting way to come onto an existing show and do my own thing as well. Especially with the state of our country right now, he’s exploring some really interesting ideas, even more so than when his film came out [in 2014]. It’s even more relevant now.

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The AFI FEST Interview: Director Mike Ott on CALIFORNIA DREAMS

Posted by Larry Gleeson

Mike Ott is a four-time AFI FEST alumnus with his feature films LITTLEROCK (AFI FEST 2010), PEARBLOSSOM HWY (AFI FEST 2012) and ACTOR MARTINEZ (AFI FEST 2016), and the short film LANCASTER, CA (AFI FEST 2015). We caught up with Ott to talk about his latest feature, CALIFORNIA DREAMS, which just had its world premiere at the 2017 Berlin Critics’ Week and will have its North American premiere at SXSW in March. (Watch a clip below.)

screen-shot-2017-03-03-at-4-46-49-pmIn the film, Ott presents five unique individuals in pursuit of a big life change. Through auditions set up in small towns across Southern California, the film shows genuine characters with big Hollywood aspirations who, for various reasons, have never had the opportunity to pursue their dreams.

AFI: What made you want to take a documentary approach to this quintessential story of making it big in Hollywood?

MO: The more films I make, the more my work leans toward incorporating documentary into fiction. The purely fictional story of making it in Hollywood has been done so many times and much better than I could ever do it. And not to say that docs on Hollywood haven’t been done to death too, but the approach we took with this film somehow gave us a bit of a strange, fresh look into a story that’s been told before. At least, that’s my hope.

AFI: This film centers around Cory Zacharia, who has been a staple of your films since LITTLEROCK. What is it about Cory that keeps bringing you back to him as both a character and subject?

MO: I remember one of my professors in grad school talking about casting and he said something to the degree of, “Casting is like if you had to spend all evening at a party watching someone. Who’s the person at the party you’d want to listen to talk, or watch interact with others, or eat a sandwich, etc.?” For me, it’s Cory. He has such unique and earnest reactions to his experiences in the world. It’s just something I find so refreshing when the rest of actors (and most of humanity) are trying to be complicated and ironic. It’s nice to explore ideas with someone who has no sense of sarcasm or irony; only pure love and joy for life, along with a point of view that is sometimes so foreign. The truth is, Cory is still such an enigma to me. Every film I’ve made was in some way to get to understand him more and how his mind works. I don’t know if I’ll ever quite figure him out, but making these films has been a big part of the journey for me.

AFI: How did you find your other subjects for CALIFORNIA DREAMS, as they all have such varied and interesting stories?

MO: I had read an article years ago about famous people and what their favorite film was and I saw that Trump’s favorite film was CITIZEN KANE, and I remember thinking how fitting that was. For some reason, it got me thinking about the link between who you are as a person and what kind of art you’re attracted to and what that says about your secret (or not-so-secret) self.

We put up flyers at local dive bars and grocery stores in my hometown and posted on non-casting websites to find people to audition, and the audition was for the person to come in and do a monologue of their choice from one of their favorite films. After each monologue, I’d interview them about the reading and try to find out how the monologue, or the film or the character they picked, related to their life.

But we didn’t want a bunch of out-of-work actors to come in and audition. We wanted to find genuine characters who didn’t live in Hollywood but who had always wanted the opportunity to be part of it.

AFI: This film is exploring some ideas set forth in your previous films, specifically the struggle with the American dream in small town U.S.A. What is it about that landscape and community that keeps bringing you back to tell these stories?

MO: Maybe because I grew up in a pretty small town and these little struggles we have in life are the ones that I find speak to the human condition in such an illuminating way — small things like wanting to go on a first date, move out of your parents house or even just leave the state on vacation for the first time ever. Those are the moments I like to explore and they remind me of what Richard Linklater said about DAZED AND CONFUSED: “Maybe the stakes in the film seem pretty low, but when it’s your life, they’re actually very high.” These are the same kind of characters I want to be surrounded by in my real life. I want to hang out with the weird kid from Bakersfield who works at Arby’s and who can’t make it to Hollywood or who can’t find love but has always dreamed of it, not the cool dude from Encino who’s mildly famous and hanging out at Soho House. That’s why AMERICAN MOVIE is one of my favorite films — and also why we have Mark Borchardt do a cameo in the movie as an homage to the film that inspired pretty much everything I make — outsiders who can’t or won’t ever quite fit into the mainstream.

AFI: This is your sixth film and you have been lucky enough to screen your work at festivals all over the world. How have you been able to master navigating the film festival world? Do you have any advice for other filmmakers who are having their first festival experiences?

MO: I’ve been very lucky in that regard, but a lot of that came from my experience with my first film ANALOG DAYS. While traveling with that film, I was worried that I had to make a certain kind of film next, and found myself trying to think about ideas that I wasn’t that attracted to but thought were “right thing to do for my career.” But the more I traveled with ANALOG DAYS and met filmmakers from all over the world, I found the people I looked up to or connected with weren’t the people with latest hit like NAPOLEON DYNAMITE-type hit film, but instead were the artists who were purely following their interests and making weird shit that no one else could make but them. And that was a very important moment for me, to learn that it’s okay to follow your interests and to be okay with the fact that your interests aren’t always going to be what’s most popular. And that’s why I ended up making almost four films in a row with Cory. I was like, this is who I want to see in films, this is who I find interesting, and if you want to watch it then great, and if not, then that’s fine too.

My advice for filmmakers having their first festival experience is to just enjoy the moment; getting to show your film to an audience is such an amazing experience. Unfortunately I think a lot of people go to festivals with other agendas thinking they have to network, and end up talking about themselves incessantly or walking around pitching themselves and their projects like some robot. Personally that makes my skin crawl, but to each his own. I’d say if you’re really interested in meeting people and making meaningful connections, you shouldn’t talk about films at all (especially your own). That’s how you know you’ve made a real friend on that festival circuit — when you can talk about anything and everything but film.

(Source: afi.com)

 

Bill Paxton: Filmmaking always my dream (2005)

Posted by Larry Gleeson

Veteran Hollywood Actor Bill Paxton has passed away at the age of 61 following “complications from surgery,” in a statement released by a family representative.

Paxton was nominated four times for the Golden Globe as an actor in 1999, 2007, 2008 and 2010. He was also nominated for a Primetime Emmy in 2012

In 2003, he won The Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films, USA Filmmaker’s Showcase Award. The award notes are as follows:

“Bill Paxton is one of the most respected actors working today. Following a long string of successful performances, Bill has stepped behind the camera and proven his skill as a director. His directorial debut, Frailty (2001), showed a keen sense of style and a powerful grasp of storytelling which puts him in the ranks of top directors working today. We feel compelled to acknowledge this masterful work.”

Also included is a clip of Mr. Paxton expressing his admiration and respect for master filmmaker and actor icon, Clint Eastwood.

Actor Bill Paxton tells Larry King that being a filmmaker was always his dream.

 

Thank you for some very memorable roles in films such as Nightcrawler, Twister, True Lies, Terminator, Titanic, Aliens, Predator 2 and Weird Science.

Rest in peace Bill Paxton.

89th Oscars Scientific & Technical Awards for 2016-17

Posted by Larry Gleeson

Beverly Wilshire Hotel
Saturday, February 11, 2017
Hosts: John Cho and Leslie Mann
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Hosts Leslie Mann, left, and John Cho

Winners

TECHNICAL ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS (ACADEMY CERTIFICATES)

To Thomson Grass Valley for the design and engineering of the pioneering Viper FilmStream digital camera system.

The Viper camera enabled frame-based logarithmic encoding, which provided uncompressed camera output suitable for importing into existing digital intermediate workflows.

To Larry Gritz for the design, implementation and dissemination of Open Shading Language (OSL).

OSL is a highly optimized runtime architecture and language for programmable shading and texturing that has become a de facto industry standard. It enables artists at all levels of technical proficiency to create physically plausible materials for efficient production rendering.

To Carl Ludwig, Eugene Troubetzkoy and Maurice van Swaaij for the pioneering development of the CGI Studio renderer at Blue Sky Studios.

CGI Studio’s groundbreakingray-tracing and adaptive sampling techniques, coupled with streamlined artist controls, demonstrated the feasibility of ray-traced rendering for feature film production.

To Brian Whited for the design and development of the Meander drawing system at Walt Disney Animation Studios.

Meander’s innovative curve-rendering method faithfully captures the artist’s intent, resulting in a significant improvement in creative communication throughout the production pipeline.

To Mark Rappaport for the concept, design and development, to Scott Oshita for the motion analysis and CAD design, to Jeff Cruts for the development of the faux-hair finish techniques, and to Todd Minobe for the character articulation and drive-train mechanisms, of the Creature Effects Animatronic Horse Puppet.

The Animatronic Horse Puppet provides increased actor safety, close integration with live action, and improved realism for filmmakers.

To Glenn Sanders and Howard Stark for the design and engineering of the Zaxcom Digital Wireless Microphone System.

The Zaxcom system has advanced the state of wireless microphone technology by creating a fully digital modulation system with a rich feature set, which includes local recording capability within the belt pack and a wireless control scheme providing real-time transmitter control and time-code distribution.

To David Thomas, Lawrence E. Fisher and David Bundy for the design, development and engineering of the Lectrosonics Digital Hybrid Wireless Microphone System.

The Lectrosonics system has advanced the state of wireless microphone technology by means of an innovative digital predictive algorithm to realize full fidelity audio transmission over a conventional analog FM radio link, by reducing transmitter size, and by increasing power efficiency. 

To Parag Havaldar for the development of expression-based facial performance-capture technology at Sony Pictures Imageworks.

This pioneering system enabled large-scale use of animation rig-based facial performance-capture for motion pictures, combining solutions for tracking, stabilization, solving and animator-controllable curve editing.

To Nicholas Apostoloff and Geoff Wedig for the design and development of animation rig-based facial performance-capture systems at ImageMovers Digital and Digital Domain.

These systems evolved through independent, then combined, efforts at two different studios, resulting in an artist-controllable, editable, scalable solution for the high-fidelity transfer of facial performances to convincing digital characters.

To Kiran Bhat, Michael Koperwas, Brian Cantwell and Paige Warner for the design and development of the ILM facial performance-capture solving system.

This system enables high-fidelity facial performance transfer from actors to digital characters in large-scale productions while retaining full artistic control, and integrates stable rig-based solving and the resolution of secondary detail in a controllable pipeline.


SCIENTIFIC AND ENGINEERING AWARDS (ACADEMY PLAQUES)

To ARRI for the pioneering design and engineering of the Super 35 format Alexa digital camera system.

With an intuitive design and appealing image reproduction, achieved through close collaboration with filmmakers, ARRI’s Alexa cameras were among the first digital cameras widely adopted by cinematographers.

To RED Digital Cinema for the pioneering design and evolution of the RED Epic digital cinema cameras with upgradeable full-frame image sensors.

RED’s revolutionary design and innovative manufacturing process have helped facilitate the wide adoption of digital image capture in the motion picture industry.

To Sony for the development of the F65 CineAlta camera with its pioneering high-resolution imaging sensor, excellent dynamic range, and full 4K output.

Sony’s unique photosite orientation and true RAW recording deliver exceptional image quality.

To Panavision and Sony for the conception and development of the groundbreaking Genesis digital motion picture camera.

Using a familiar form factor and accessories, the design features of the Genesis allowed it to become one of the first digital cameras to be adopted by cinematographers.

To Marcos Fajardo for the creative vision and original implementation of the Arnold Renderer, and to Christopher Kulla, Alan King, Thiago Ize and Clifford Stein for their highly optimized geometry engine and novel ray-tracing algorithms which unify the rendering of curves, surfaces, volumetrics and subsurface scattering as developed at Sony Pictures Imageworks and Solid Angle SL.

Arnold’s scalable and memory-efficient single-pass architecture for path tracing, its authors’ publication of the underlying techniques, and its broad industry acceptance were instrumental in leading a widespread adoption of fully ray-traced rendering for motion pictures.

To Vladimir Koylazov for the original concept, design and implementation of V-Ray from Chaos Group.

V-Ray’s efficient production-ready approach to ray-tracing and global illumination, its support for a wide variety of workflows, and its broad industry acceptance were instrumental in the widespread adoption of fully ray-traced rendering for motion pictures.

To Luca Fascione, J.P. Lewis and Iain Matthews for the design, engineering, and development of the FACETS facial performance capture and solving system at Weta Digital.

FACETS was one of the first reliable systems to demonstrate accurate facial tracking from an actor-mounted camera, combined with rig-based solving, in large-scale productions. This system enables animators to bring the nuance of the original live performances to a new level of fidelity for animated characters.

To Steven Rosenbluth, Joshua Barratt, Robert Nolty and Archie Te for the engineering and development of the Concept Overdrive motion control system.

This user-friendly hardware and software system creates and controls complex interactions of real and virtual motion in hard real-time, while safely adapting to the needs of on-set filmmakers.

 

(Source: oscars.org)

Netflix Takes Over Distribution for Martin Scorsese’s ‘The Irishman’

Posted by Larry Gleeson

By Rachel Lutack

The world of film distribution is truly changing with the news that the streaming service Netflix will be taking worldwide rights to Martin Scorceses’s gangster film The Irishman. Typically a studio big-hitter, the Scorsese-Robert De Niro $100 million re-team was under the umbrella of Paramount Picture – the company has an overall feature deal with the director running through 2019. Indiewire reports that the studio was not prepared to take the huge risk that this film would require, however.

The Irishman will star De Niro as Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran, a hitman for the mob who was rumored to be involved in the death of Jimmy Hoffa. The screenplay was adapted by Steve Zaillian from Charles Brandt’s book I Heard You Paint Houses. Part of the risk of Scorsese’s film (aside from the $100 million budget) is that he plans to use special effects to turn De Niro back into a 30-year-old man. Al Pacino may also be going through the treatment for the film, although his involvement is still in negotiations.

Paramount was originally handling North American distribution with STX Entertainment with taking over foreign rights after a $50 million deal at Cannes last year. Despite the great ambition of the project, Scorsese is known for turning out massive numbers at the box office, with The Wolf of Wall Street bringing in $392 million globally.

Now that Netflix has taken over, that will likely mean STX is out as well. The newly minted distributors plan to release the film in 2019, with a limited theatrical release prior to that for an Oscar push. When all is said and done, the freedom of a platform like Netflix may be just what Scorsese needs to make his vision a reality.

(Source: mxdwn.com)

Berlinale FILM REVIEW: Andres Veiel’s ‘Beuys’ is One for the Ages

Posted by Larry Gleeson

Andres Veiel brought the documentary Beuys, an in-depth look into the profound psyche of German performance artist and 1960’s era philosophe, Joseph Beuys, and a co-production from Terz Filmproduktion, Köln, SWR, Baden-Baden, WDR, Köln in cooperation with Arte, to the 2017 Berlin International Film Festival. Veiel studied directing and dramaturgy at the Künstlerhaus Bethanien in Berlin under Krzysztof Kieślowski. Some of his other documentary works include Balagan (Berlinale 1994) and Black Box BRD (Black Box Germany, Berlinale 2002). His feature film debut Wer wenn nicht wir (If Not Us, Who) premiered in the Berlinale Competition in 2011 and won the Alfred Bauer Prize.

screen-shot-2017-02-24-at-5-34-23-amUtilizing previously unpublished archival video and audio footage, In Beuys Veiel brings light to a man of profound intellectual capacity in the vein of Goethe, Voltaire and Machiavelli. Often derided in his home country of Germany, Joseph Beuys, holds the distinction of being the first German artist to be granted a solo exhibition at the Guggenheim Museum in New York. While most contemporaries compare Beuys to another 1960’s era personality, Andy Warhol, Veiel’s Beuys, emerges from a much deeper metaphysical, philosophical framework.

The film is a linear piece. Veiel uses a cookie cutter approach in introducing the viewer to the central character. A Beuys voice-over-narration philosophises on the properties of art while still photos are shown in 3-5 second intervals set to non-diagetic music and sounds.A first real, humanistic impression is of Beuys performing on the street in clown-like fashion drawing attention to himself. Eccentric. Yet quite popular.

From here Veiel moves right into one of the most critical tenants of Beuys’ social outlook with an archival video clip of Beuys on money. Beuys acquiesces he wants to get by and thus money is important. Then, Beuys goes nuclear with “but it’s not part of the revolution.”

Quickly an interesting distinction is made by Veiel as Beuys is commonly referred to as the “Andy Warhol of Germany.”  Warhol, an American pop cultural icon, loved and adored for his flamboyant use of everyday, commonplace items like a Campbell’s soup can to create art, is shown via archival footage stating “every moral situation has the potential to become art.” Beuys, on the other hand is often shown being mocked and derided by the formal press in this documentary, takes Warhol’s statement further into the humanist/social philosophical lineage that “every social situation has the potential to be art.”

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A well-liked teacher, philosopher and Green Party candidate for Prime Minister, Beuys was questioned deeply, just short of being interrogated, over his art and his ideas. One particularly obtuse questioner, posed the query, “Do you consider yourself an artist?” Followed by “Will you use baby buggies in your next art project?” Loud guffaws from the present journalists set the tone for Beuys’ response. With a quiet, reflective voice, Beuys answered that he felt “everyone is an artist.” Facing further derision, Beuys quickly moved his response into a less provocative line of thought with “I mean social art when I say everyone is an artist.” Herein lies the essence of Beuys truth. Beuys profoundly believed in everyone’s unique capacity to move society and culture forward to a more perfect state of being through “the existence of an objective, intellectually comprehensible spiritual world that is accessible by direct experience through inner development,” known as anthroposophy. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthroposophy)

screen-shot-2017-02-24-at-5-29-22-amThroughout the film, Beuys defied and acted against much of what he saw as injustice through his art work seeking a better way and ultimately a better society. With this mindset, Beuys endlessly worked toward a more perfect state. His art and his world views reflected this aim. In one particularly bold art project Beuys promised a planting of 7000 new trees. Using 7000 rock boulders placed in a free space the project began. As a tree was planted a boulder was removed. Veiel uses time lapse via still photos to mark the passage of time as the boulders slowly disappear and new trees are seen being planted. As the project neared completion, however, Beuys’ light began to fade as he called for an end to currency’s dominant role in democracy. Despite his art work being called “the most expensive piece of trash,” Beuys, disciplined and tempered from war wounds, held his ground responding, “Yes, I want to expand people’s consciousness.”

In Beuys, Director Veiel lets the artist speak for himself without outsiders commenting creating an expansive space for the exploration of Beuys’ ideas. Joseph Beuys passed away in 1986. Interestingly, Beuys sweeping concepts of art are still alive and relevant today in Germany’s ongoing social, moral and political debates. The film was presented in black and white with traditional documentary filmmaking techniques including narrative voice-overs, still photography, archival film clips, and present day interviews from primary and secondary sources.

As the film closes, Joseph Beuys emerges as a man of the ages, a thinker beyond his time. Often seen as a revolutionary, Joseph Beuys was seemingly always a mind in touch with the absolute principle behind Thomas Hobbes’ “Leviathan.” Highly recommended and hands down, my favorite film of the festival.

*All photos courtesy of berlinale.de

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Golden Bear and Prizes of the Berlin International Jury

Posted by Larry Gleeson

Quite an eventful 67th Berlinale. Some fantastic films. I had the good fortune to view all but one of the award-winning films, Silver Bear for Best Screenplay, Sebastián Lelio and Gonzalo Maza’s  Una mujer fantástica (A Fantastic Woman).  Pokot Spoor winner of the Silver Bear Alfred Bauer Prize for a feature film that opens new perspectives from Agnieszka Holland did not receive my recommendation. Thank you to the jury for all their hard work and diligent efforts!

*Members of the Jury: Paul Verhoeven (Jury President), Dora Bouchoucha Fourati, Olafur Eliasson, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Julia Jentsch, Diego Luna and Wang Quan’an

PRIZES OF THE INTERNATIONAL JURY

 

GOLDEN BEAR FOR BEST FILM (awarded to the film’s producer) Testről és lélekről On Body and Soul by Ildikó Enyedi

SILVER BEAR GRAND JURY PRIZE Félicité by Alain Gomis

SILVER BEAR ALFRED BAUER PRIZE for a feature film that opens new perspectives Pokot Spoor by Agnieszka Holland

SILVER BEAR FOR BEST DIRECTOR Aki Kaurismäki for Toivon tuolla puolen (The Other Side of Hope/Die andere Seite der Hoffnung)

SILVER BEAR FOR BEST ACTRESS Kim Minhee in Bamui haebyun-eoseo honja (On the Beach at Night Alone) by Hong Sangsoo

SILVER BEAR FOR BEST ACTOR Georg Friedrich in Helle Nächte (Bright Nights) by Thomas Arslan

SILVER BEAR FOR BEST SCREENPLAY Sebastián Lelio and Gonzalo Maza for Una mujer fantástica (A Fantastic Woman) by Sebastián Lelio

SILVER BEAR FOR OUTSTANDING ARTISTIC CONTRIBUTION in the categories camera, editing, music score, costume or set design

*Dana Bunescu for the editing in Ana, mon amour by Călin Peter Netzer

The complete award list of the 67th Berlinale: 67_berlinale_awards-1

Logo-Berlinale-Facebook

(Source: Berlinale Press Office)