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BRAD PITT ANNOUNCES BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID – AFI MOVIE CLUB

Posted by Larry Gleeson

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AFI MOVIE CLUB

BRAD PITT ANNOUNCES BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID

April 6, 2020

Brad Pitt announces today’s AFI Movie Club selection: BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID. Starring Paul Newman and Robert Redford as the infamous outlaws, the film appears on AFI’s original and 10th-anniversary lists of the greatest American films – and the dynamic duo of Butch and Sundance were co-ranked #20 among AFI’s greatest screen heroes!

DID YOU KNOW? The real Butch Cassidy never used violence or firearms until he moved to Bolivia in the last days of his life. William Goldman, who won an Oscar® for writing the film, said that this paradox in Cassidy’s character was his primary motivator in developing the story for the film. View this exclusive AFI Archive video of Goldman talking about writing the film.

Interesting Facts

Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid were real-life outlaws living at the turn of the 20th century.

The real Butch Cassidy never used violence or firearms until he moved to Bolivia in the last days of his life.

Robert LeRoy Parker and Harry Alonzo Longabaugh – the real-life Butch and Sundance! – were members of a gang called The Wild Bunch. The gang’s name was never referred to in the movie to avoid confusion with another western in theaters that same year – Sam Peckinpah’s THE WILD BUNCH!

Stars Paul Newman and Robert Redford teamed up with director George Roy Hill for THE STING in 1973. That later film would win Best Picture at the Academy Awards®!

BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID was the highest-grossing Western ever made. Adjusted for today’s numbers, the film would have earned over a half billion dollars!

Paul Newman, an early investor in BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID, initially planned to play Sundance with Steve McQueen as his co-star.

The movie doesn’t end at the credits: Family-friendly Discussion Questions 

Join the conversation on Twitter and Instagram now using #AFIMovieClub. Or post your responses in the comment section below

-Is this the first time you’ve seen BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID? 

-Does the Western theme remind you of other kinds of movies you’ve seen that are not typically considered to be Westerns, such as STAR WARS? 

-The dynamic duo Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid were co-ranked #20 on AFI’s 100 YEARS…100 HEROES & VILLAINS list. Would you describe them as heroes? Why or why not? 

-BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID was released in September 1969. What else was going in our nation at that time – and why do you think this movie resonated so strongly with audiences? 

-Why do you think BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID is still so beloved after 51 years? 

-How would you rate BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID? 

EXTRA – Listen to what everyday funnyman Ben Stiller has to say about the film and about Woodcock, in aprticular, here:

I hope the AFI Movie Club brings some inspiration and entertainment during this uncertain time when we are reminded “There’s no place like home.” AFI has created a global, virtual gathering of those who love the movies where each day’s film – announced by a special guest – is accompanied by fun facts, family-friendly discussion points and material from the AFI Archive to bring the viewing experience to life. As a non-profit, AFI Movie Club is a member-powered organization, dependent upon the support of its movie fans. To support AFI Movie Club please consider becoming a member or donating.

About AFI Movie Club

AFI Movie Club is a newly launched free program to raise the nation’s spirits by bringing artists and audiences together – even while we are apart. AFI will shine a spotlight on an iconic movie each day, with special guests announcing select AFI Movies of the Day in short videos posted on AFI.com and social media platforms. Audiences can “gather” at AFI.com/MovieClub to find out how to watch the featured movie of the day with the use of their preexisting streaming service credentials. The daily film selections will be supported by fun facts, family discussion points and exclusive material from the AFI Archive to enrich the viewing experience. Audiences can continue the conversation online using the hashtag #AFIMovieClub. Learn more at AFI.com and follow us on social media at Facebook.com/AmericanFilmInstitute, youtube.com/AFI, twitter.com/AmericanFilm, and Instagram.com/AmericanFilmInstitute.

AFI MOVIE CLUB

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Images of the 60’s from the Venice International Film Festival

 

*Featured Photo: Brigitte Bardot illuminating Venice with her presence in 1958: the photographers chase her and she immediately becomes the center of social life on the Lido. “BB”, at the peak of her career, came to the 19th Venice Film Festival as part of the cast of the film En cas de malheur (Love Is My Profession) by Claude Autant-Lara. (Photo credit courtesy of Asac – la Biennale di Venezia.)

 
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Claudia Cardinale steps down onto the dock of the Hotel Excelsior, in 1965: she was one of the most highly acclaimed divas that year as the star of the film Vague Stars of Ursa, by Lucchino Visconti, which would win the Golden Lion as Best Film. (Photo courtesy of Asac – la Biennale di Venezia)
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1958: Sophia Loren is thrilled to embrace the Coppa Volpi for Best Actress which she had just won for the film Black Orchid by Martin Ritt. (Photo courtesy of Asac – la Biennale di Venezia)
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Young, naively seductive, star of the masterpiece-scandal of the 1962 Venice Film Festival: sixteen-year-old Sue Lyon, the unforgettable Lolita in Stanley Kubrick’s film, at a party on the Lido. Kubrick did not come to Venice: only Ms. Lyon was there to attend the official screening in the Sala Grande on August 31, 1962. That year the films also included Momma Roma, by Pier Pasolini, and Knife in the Water by Roman Polanski. (Photo courtesy of Asac- la Biennale di Venezia)

 

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1963: Paul Newman comes to Venice as the star of Hud by Martin Ritt, presented in Competition. The Lido went crazy for the most famous of Hollywood’s superstars: Newman was 38 years old, he was at the peak of his career, and journalists went out of their way to meet him. Oriana Fallaci interviewed him at the Venice Film Festival for “L’Europeo” with her unmistakable directness, she asked him to take off his glasses during the conversation. Newman answered: “If someone asks to take off your glasses, I want to see your blue eyes, it makes me so angry. Just like when they tell me ‘you’re so great, and your eyes are so blue.’ I always get the impression that when you’re handsome, people accept you for the wrong reasons: not because of who you are but because you are handsome.” (Photo courtesy of Asac – la Biennale di Venezia)
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A crowded red carpet for the opening ceremony of the 28th edition of the Venice Film Festival, on August 28th, 1966: making his appearance is Ugo Tognazzi surrounded by Franca Bettoia, Olga Villi, Tina Louise, Les Crane and Alicia Brandet. They are all headed into the Sala Grande for the opening film, The Wild Angels, by Roger Corman, starring Peter Fonda and Nancy Sinatra. (Photo courtesy of Asac – la Biennale di Venezia)

 

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Triumphant red carpet for the cast members Annie Girardot, Renato Salvatori, Claudia Cardinale, Max Cartier, Alain Delon, and Katrina Paxinou from the film  Rocco And His Brothers. (Photo courtesy of Asac – la Biennale di Venezia)
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1965: Ermanno Olmi and Rod Steiger talk as they descend the staircase of the Hotel Excelsior on the way to the beach. The director was at the Venice Film Festival, Out of Competition, with the film A Man Called John, a tribute to the figure of Pope John XXIII, starring Steiger and Adolfo Celi. (Photo courtesy of Asac – la Biennale di Venezia)
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The gondola hoisted in front of the Palazzo del Cinema to promote Tinto Brass’ 1963 film, Chi Lavora e Perduto. (Photo courtesy of Asac – la Biennale di Venezia)
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1968: A young Bernardo Bertolucci, in Competition at the Venice Film Festival with the film, Partner, in conversation with the Director of the Festival, Luigi Chiarini. (Photo courtesy of Asac – la Biennale di Venezia)
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1968: Liliana Cavani receives a bouquet in Sala Grande, shortly before the official screening of her film, Galileo, presented in Competition. Standing next to her is the star of the film, S0uth African Cyril Cusack. (Photo courtesy of Asac – la Biennale di Venezia)

 

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Dustin Hoffman and his wife Anne Byrne Hoffman in the Sala Grande in 1971: the actor came to the Venice Film Festival as the star of Who Is Harry Kellerman and Why Is He Saying Those Terrible Things About Me? by Ulu Grosbard. (Photo courtesy of Asac – la Biennale di Venezia)
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The great Charlie Chaplin receives the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement in 1972. To celebrate him, the Venice Film Festival that year organized a major retrospective of his work, “Il tutto Chaplin 1914-1966,” screening many of the early short films he made as his trademark character. (Photo courtesy of Asac – la Biennale di Venezia)